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Stories of sleep: A thematic analysis on how people talk about sleep difficulties

Stories of sleep: A thematic analysis on how people talk about sleep difficulties

By Laurie Scarborough Abstract Sleep is essential for optimal functioning, and problems in sleep can result in cognitive, emotional and social dysfunction. A greater understanding of sleep and the reasons for poor sleep is thus important, in order to inform interventions for people who suffer from sleeping problems. This is a mixed method study that … Continue reading

Are identity lineups fair?

Are identity lineups fair?

By Laurie Scarborough The use of identification lineups, has been well-established and they are often the most important evidence against a suspect (Wells, Leippe, & Ostrom, 1979). Despite this, there are many difficulties with identification parades (Ainsworth, 1998; Wells et al., 1979). Lineup fairness and bias, in terms of procedure and construction, is a concern. … Continue reading

The thin blue line: Stress and trauma in police work

The thin blue line: Stress and trauma in police work

By Laurie Scarborough Police work is considered one of the most stressful professions (Gulle, Tredoux, & Foster, 1998; Mostert & Rothman, 2006; Renck, Weisæth, & Skarbö, 2002; Storm & Rothman, 2003). Police are frequently exposed to danger, threat and violence, which can lead to trauma (Burke & Mikkelsen, 2006; Regehr, Johanis, Dimitropoulos, Bartram, & Hope, … Continue reading

Do nightmares have a function?

Do nightmares have a function?

By Laurie Scarborough Nightmares, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, are distressing dreams that involve themes of fear, anxiety, escape or avoidance of threatening situations, and awaken the sleeper (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Nightmares have a prevalence of 1-6% among adults, making them equally as ubiquitous as mood and anxiety … Continue reading

Is ADHD becoming an epidemic?

Is ADHD becoming an epidemic?

By Laurie Scarborough Attention-Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) symptoms began to be documented about a century ago (Kos & Richdale, 2004). Epidemiological studies show that prevalence rates have soared since then with rates increasing from 3% in 1980 (American Psychiatric Association, 1980), to modern prevalence rates reaching as high as 18% (Rowland et al., 2002). Why … Continue reading